Journalist Robert K Oermann, Artist Anna Jaap Team For Exhibit Highlighting Nashville’s Hidden Histories

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• February 10, 2017

Al Capone’s bookmaker John Welch built this structure between 1929 and 1932. En route between Chicago and Florida, the notorious gangster used it as his rest stop and hideout. Today, it is a recording studio called The Castle. Nearly 500 top artists have recorded at The Castle. Among them are Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton, Alabama, Johnny Cash, Michael Bolton, Bon Jovi, and more.

A new exhibit highlighting unique locations in Nashville’s history, “Hiding In Plain Sight,” will open at the Nashville Library with a special reception Feb. 18 in the Courtyard Gallery from 3-5 p.m. Nashville artist Anna Jaap and journalist/MusicRow contributor Robert K. Oermann collaborated on the new exhibit of photos and stories of hidden historical locations that were inspired from the nearly three decades that Nashville resident Oermann spent driving, studying, and researching Music City’s history.

Portrait subjects include homes where Hank Williams and Patsy Cline once resided, Grand Ole Opry founder George D. Hay’s home, churches with Civil Rights Movement history, Nashville’s first auto factory, and the spot where Lay’s Potato Chips were once made.

 “Celebrating great art and artists is part of Nashville Public Library’s mission to connect our community,” said Library Director Kent Oliver. “We are pleased to showcase these portraits that give viewers such insight into our city.”

The new exhibit will run until June 18.

Both the Omohundro Water Treatment Plant and the City Reservoir (on 8th Ave. S.) were built in 1889. They are on the National Registry of Historical Places, and both are still serving the community.

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